Suicide: the one truly serious philosophical problem — Camus

The Floating Library

O my soul, do not aspire to
immortal life, but exhaust the limits of the possible.

— Pindar, Pythian iii

An Absurd Reasoning

Absurdity and Suicide

There is but one truly serious philosophical problem, and that is suicide. Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy. All the rest — whether or not the world has three dimensions, whether the mind has nine or twelve categories — comes afterwards. These are games; one must first answer. And if it is true, as Nietzsche claims, that a philosopher, to deserve our respect, must preach by example, you can appreciate the importance of that reply, for it will precede the definitive act. These are facts the heart can feel; yet they call for careful study before they become clear to the intellect.

If I ask myself how to judge that this question is…

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Five Stages Of Depression

Thought Catalog

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On the onset of a major depressive episode, sufferers will most likely ponder a series of questions: How could this happen? Where did it come from? Why does mental illness have to be so stigmatizing? It’s a mix of denial and anger, similar to the first two stages of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’s famous model on death and dying. Although her model outlines the coping process for the terminally ill, I believe the same logic applies equally well for sufferers of depression.

Formed after interviewing thousands of terminally ill patients in the late 1960s, Kübler-Ross’s hypothesis became a breakthrough in the field of near-death studies. Over the years, people have found solace knowing that acceptance, the fifth and final stage, is possible. Although depression is not a fatal diagnosis, for those suffering, thoughts of death will loom heavy. Some may feel death has already arrived, floating through a worldly existence they…

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Osteoarthritis (OA) dealing with OA with dietary supplements

useful information.some people are becoming crippled/enlaved with OA. http://www.arthrolink.com/en/disease/knowing/evolution-osteoarthritis

drpvramana

OSTEO ARTHRITIS (OA)

I started experiencing OA pain in right knee since last 5 months. The pain crept up gradually to hip joint as well. This is a post giving details of how I am coping with this with dietary supplements only so far.

Caution: Painkillers are best avoided in OA, since they cause acidity, and hardening of arteries as well. Arteries can become so brittle that it is possible to experience uncontrollable multiple arteries ‘splitting’ and flooding the body with blood! This is the reason I chose to deal with OA with food supplements only, and NO DRUGS AND NO PAINKILLERS!

The supplements I am using:

Glucosamine with Diacerene – This helps to povide the aminoacids required in building new cartilege. Glucosamine is also a natural painkiller after continued use of several weeks. Doctors recommend life long use

Latest versions of Calcium intake – Brittle bone tissue is also…

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Not all Atheists are created equal…

nice

just a couple of atheists...

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When it comes to living an openly secular lifestyle I am often confronted with questions that start out with “Does an Atheist…” or “Do Atheists…”. Of course I have no problem answering any questions that are thrown out to me, but whenever they are prefaced with this type of generalization I make sure that one thing is clear… I cannot speak for all Atheists, I can only speak for myself.  Somehow this is frequently met with a bit of confusion, as more and more people are lumping Atheism with religion. People assume that, just like religions have rules that you (are supposed to) live by that Atheists do as well but this is not so. The only thing that all Atheists have in common is a concrete stance that their is no deity directing their life. After that it is up to the individual to decide what type of life they want…

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